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Top New York
Fishing Lakes & Rivers

Lake Champlain
Lake George
Lake Erie
Lake Ontario
Hudson River
Oneida Lake
Niagara River
Cayuga Lake
Seneca Lake
St. Lawrence River
Chautauqua Lake
Great Sacandaga Lake
Delaware River
Canandaigua Lake
Salmon River
Lake Placid
Keuka Lake
Mohawk River
Otsego Lake
Saratoga Lake
Susquehanna River
Black Lake
Beaverkill River

 

New York Fishing
NY Fishing

 

Welcome to New York Fishing

 

New York is well known for great Bass, Salmon, and Trout Fishing in the many lakes, rivers, ponds, and reservoirs throughout New York State. NewYorkFishing.US is where you can find detailed information on the Top New York Fishing Lakes, New York Fishing Charters, New York Fishing Resorts, Finger Lakes Fishing, New York Rivers, Long Island Fishing, Lake Maps, NY Boat Launches, and MORE.

New York Bass Fishing

NY Bass Fishing

When it comes to successful bass fishing on New York lakes, finding bass is the biggest challenge in catching bass. Bass hang out in very specific places for very specific reasons. No matter where bass are found, they experience an annual cycle of activity that is much the same. Spring warmth in New York triggers a move to the shallows to feed and spawn. Bass stage a pre-spawn feeding frenzy in water from mid 40s to the high 50s. The bass will be highly concentrated on New York lakes in the areas that warm earliest. For example: the extreme shallow ends of coves, channels between lakes or bays, little protected bays with dark bottoms and in shallow channels. The main thing is to find a good, warm bay and then do a decent job of casting to the banks. The bass are going to be tight to the banks. The water in New York lakes and rivers warms steadily after the spawn as the bass begin to move toward their summer haunts and prepare for serious feeding.

 

Early summer bass wreak havoc on the minnows spawning in the shallows where the bass just spawned. Spinnerbaits, jig/minnow combinations, and plastic worms are top baits used in the spring. As summer approaches on New York lakes the fish have come off their post-spawn behavior and the lake is setting up in a summer pattern. To a great extent, the active schools of bass will congregate on the inside turns in weeds on breaks near the shore. The inside turns that hold the most and biggest bass are those with the thickest new weeds and the fastest drops into deeper water. Try fishing 6-12 feet of water, but check down as far as 20 feet. At this time of year on New York lakes the active bass will be tightly grouped, and you will almost always find some on inside turns. Other great places to check for bass in the summer months is around points, flats, docks, and any cover. After a cold front, bass often tuck up in the dense, floating masses of any weedbeds or vegetation on a lake. Throughout the summer on New York lakes with weedlines bass fishing can be very good. Deep weedlines naturally attract bass, as it's the place where the security of deep water meets the cover and food of the weeds. If a lake has good deeper weeds, that's where bass spend most of their time. In New York lakes that do not have much weed cover, bass will spend more time on dropoffs.

 

Cooling water in the fall brings on more changes. The fall turnover destroys the thermal stratification on the lake, so uniform temperatures top to bottom allow the bass to move up, down, or sideways wherever they choose. Fall bass are very active, moving from deep water to shallow water searching for food. Studies have shown that bass do more prowling now than at any other time of the year.


Top New York Bass Fishing Lakes

Lake Champlain

Oneida Lake

Lake Erie

Seneca Lake

Finger Lakes


New York Walleye Fishing
NY Walleye Fishing

Walleye tend to be structure fish. Great places to check for walleye on NY Lakes include; rocky points, reefs, sunken islands, boulder piles, sand flats, and rocky shoals. Also, when the wind blows, walleyes bite. In the spring, NY walleyes like to hang in the shallows after spawning, typically in water no deeper than 15 feet. By the time June arrives in New York, walleye head for deep shoreline points, sunken islands, sandbars, and rock bars in depths ranging from 20-30 feet.

Top New York Walleye Fishing Lakes

Lake Erie

Lake Ontario

Oneida Lake

Chautauqua Lake

Lake Champlain


New York River Fishing

New York features many Rivers that are known for great fishing year round. The major factors to consider when reading a NY River are the strength and direction of the current, the depth, the amount of cover, and the make-up of the riverbed. Most species of fish in New York's Rivers like to hang where the current is neither too strong or too slow, where there's a fair amount of water to cover their backs, where they can find shelter from predators, and where there is clean gravel or sand over which they can find food easily.

Reading New York Rivers
1. Bridges almost always prove a magnet for fish, especially the deep pools that form down stream.
2. Fallen trees offer fish shelter from the current and protection from predators.
3. Big underwater rocks attract bottom feeders as well as overhanging trees.
4. Deep pools will always hold fish in the winter and during summer droughts.
5. Bends are a favorite area for prey fish and predators, as well as places the river narrows and deepens.


Top New York Fishing Rivers

St. Lawrence River

Niagara River

Hudson River

Delaware River

Salmon River


New York Trout Fishing
New York Trout Fishing

In a stream, trout like to stay in the same spots, they find shelter from the current waiting for food to come along. In New York's larger bodies of water like lakes and ponds, trout like to stay on the move. They are most attracted to areas rich in food to maximize their feeding chances. Trout prefer temps between 50-60 F. Brown Trout tend to like slightly warmer temps, while Brook Trout prefer cooler temperatures. If you are fishing a deep New York lake with stratified water temps, finding the fish becomes a game of depths. In the warm NY summer months, trout head to the deeper points. In the late fall, winter, and spring the trout head to shallower depths as the deepest parts are often too cold.

New York Crappie Fishing

During the summer months is when crappies need to eat the most. Try searching for suspended crappie with sonar, then hover off the edge of the pod and drop lures and baits just above them. Crappies love to hunt over and around weeds during the low-light periods while during the day they suspend over deeper water nearby. In late summer, you can normally find them 12-24 feet down during the day and sometimes even shallower. By September, crappies leave the cabbage beds to hang near wintering spots. New York lakes and rivers contain many crappie hotspots. Here are some of the top places for successful crappie fishing on New York lakes and rivers.

Points

Shallow Ledges and Channel Breaks

Beaver Lodges

Flooded Willows

Isolated Stumps

Inflow Water-Control Structures

Thicket Structures

Lake Erie Smallmouth Bass Fishing
NY Bass Fishing

To find shallow smallmouth bass on Lake Erie, search for bottom transitions, vegetation, or deeper trenches near rocky flats. Make sure to check 3-6 foot shoreline rock-boulder flats with inside ledges that drop into 6-9 foot depths before reverting to shallow flats. Smallmouth bass like to cruise these inside drop-off ledges and wander up onto the flats in search of food, primarily crayfish. Shallow fish on Lake Erie feed on schooling emerald shiners when they're available, along with crayfish and gobies. Areas of broken rock hold more and better fish than areas without broken rock. Also, look for transitions, as this could be moss patches on a sand bottom, sand meeting gravel or rock, or where rock meets gravel. Sweet spots always contain a transition of two or more elements.


Top New York Smallmouth Bass Fishing Lakes

Lake Erie

Lake Champlain

Finger Lakes

Oneida Lake

Adirondack Lakes


St. Lawrence River Muskie Fishing

The St. Lawrence River has lived up to its reputation as a great muskie fishing river by producing a catch over 60" in 2011. Trolling large diving plugs is the prominent approach, with late fall prime for record-size fish. As part of its recovery from a VHS kill, St. Lawrence River muskies are currently experiencing incredible growth rates with girths to make any New York angler smile.



New York Fishing Records
Walleye - 16 lb. 9 oz., 34 inches, Mystic Lake '09
Muskie - 69 lb. 15 oz., 64.5 inches, St. Lawrence River '57

Tiger Muskie - 35 lb. 8 oz., 50 inches, Tioughnioga River '90
Northern Pike - 46 lb. 2 oz., Great Sacandaga Lake '40
Largemouth Bass - 11 lb. 4 oz., 25.5 inches, Buckhorn Lake '87
Smallmouth Bass - 8 lb. 4 oz., Lake Erie '95
Striped Bass - 55 lb. 6 oz., 49.375 inches, Hudson River '07
Atlantic Salmon - 24 lb. 15 oz., 35 inches, Lake Ontario '97
Chinook Salmon - 47 lb. 13 oz., 48 inches, Salmon River '91
Coho Salmon - 33 lb. 7 oz., 41.9 inches, Lake Ontario '98
Pink Salmon - 4 lb. 15 oz., Lake Erie '85
Brown Trout - 33 lb. 2 oz., 38 inches, Lake Ontario '97
Lake Trout - 41 lb. 8 oz., 42.75 inches, Lake Erie '03
Rainbow Trout - 31 lb. 3 oz., 39 inches, Lake Ontario '04
American Shad - 9 lb. 4 oz., 28 inches, Hudson River '07
Black Crappie - 3 lb. 12 oz., 17.75 inches, Duck Lake '98
Bluegill - 2 lb. 8 oz., 12 inches, Kohlbach Pond '92
Bowfin - 12 lb. 14 oz., 34 inches, Lake Champlain '06
Burbot - 16 lb. 12 oz., 34.75 inches, Lake Ontario '91
Freshwater Drum - 24 lb. 8 oz., 35 inches, Lake Ontario '05
Lake Whitefish - 10 lb. 8 oz., 27.87 inches, Lake Pleasant '95
Longnose Gar - 13 lb. 3 oz., 49.5 inches, Lake Champlain '99
Sauger - 4 lb. 8 oz., 22.19 inches, Lower Niagara River '90

 

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